Visiter le siteVisiter le site  AccueilAccueil  PortailPortail  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Le sens du récit chez REH

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Steve Costigan

avatar

Nombre de messages : 592
Age : 38
Localisation : Reims !
Date d'inscription : 14/09/2005

MessageSujet: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 3:38

Je risque d'écrire un article sur ce sujet et, à ce propos, il y a un aspect de la jeunesse de Robert Howard sur lequel je me pose des questions.
J'ai lu quelque part, probablement dans les préfaces de François Truchaud, que Robert Howard avait été bercé durant son enfance par les histoires des premiers colons narrées par sa grand-mère (laquelle ?) et par les contes que lui racontait leur cuisinière Noire.
Alors Patrice, pourrais-tu me confirmer cela ? En sais-tu plus ?

_________________
There is no force, no money and no power to stop us now !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://sanahultivers.over-blog.com/
louinet

avatar

Nombre de messages : 520
Localisation : Tarantia
Date d'inscription : 15/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 4:43

ou là là...

Par où commencer...

Voici déja le texte auquel Truchaud se référait, tiré d'une lettre à Lovecraft de Septembre 1930:

As regards African-legend sources, I well remember the tales I listened to and shivered at, when a child in the “piney woods” of East Texas, where Red River marks the Arkansaw and Texas boundaries. There were quite a number of old slave darkies still living then. The one to whom I listened most was the cook, old Aunt Mary Bohannon, who was nearly white – about one sixteenth negro, I should say. Mistreatment of slaves is, and has been somewhat exaggerated, but old Aunt Mary had had the misfortune, in her youth, to belong to a man whose wife was a fiend from Hell. The young slave women were fine young animals, and barbarically handsome; her mistress was frenziedly jealous. You understand. Aunt Mary told tales of torture and unmistakable sadism that sickens [sic] me to this day when I think of them. Thank God the slaves on my ancestors’ plantations were never so misused. And Aunt Mary told how one day, when the black people were in the fields, a hot wind swept over them and they knew that “ol’ Misses Bohannon” was dead. Returning to the manor house they found that it was so and the slaves danced and shouted with joy. Aunt Mary said that when a good spirit passes, a breath of cool air follows; but when an evil spirit goes by a blast from the open doors of Hell follows it.
She told many tales, one which particularly made my hair rise; it occurred in her youth. A young girl going to the river for water, met, in the dimness of dusk, an old man, long dead, who carried his severed head in one hand. This, said Aunt Mary, occurred on the plantation of her master, and she herself saw the girl come screaming through the dusk, to be whipped for throwing away the water-buckets in her flight.
Another tale she told that I have often met with in negro-lore. The setting, time and circumstances are changed by telling, but the tale remains basically the same. Two or three men – usually negroes – are travelling in a wagon through some isolated district – usually a broad, deserted river-bottom. They come on to the ruins of a once thriving plantation at dusk, and decide to spend the night in the deserted plantation house. This house is always huge, brooding and forbidding, and always, as the men approach the high columned verandah, through the high weeds that surround the house, great numbers of pigeons rise from their roosting places on the railing and fly away. The men sleep in the big front-room with its crumbling fire-place, and in the night they are awakened by a jangling of chains, weird noises and groans from upstairs. Sometimes footsteps descend the stairs with no visible cause. Then a terrible apparition appears to the men who flee in terror. This monster, in all the tales I have heard, is invariably a headless giant, naked or clad in shapeless [sic] sort of garment, and is sometimes armed with a broad-axe. This motif appears over and over in negro-lore. I do not know what sort of tales modern darkies tell. For years I have lived in a section where negroes are very rare. Indeed, no colored person is allowed to remain over night in this county.
But through most of the stories I heard in my childhood, the dark, brooding old plantation house loomed as a horrific back-ground and the human or semi-human horror, with its severed head was woven in the fiber of the myths.
But no negro ghost-story ever gave me the horrors as did the tales told by my grandmother. All the gloominess and dark mysticism of the Gaelic nature was her’s [sic], and there was no light and mirth in her. Her tales showed what a strange legion of folk-lore grew up in the Scotch-Irish settlements of the Southwest, where transplanted Celtic myths and fairy-tales met and mingled with a sub-stratem [sic] of slave legends. My grandmother was but one generation removed from south Ireland and she knew by heart all the tales and superstitions of the folks, black or white, about her.
As a child my hair used to stand straight up when she would tell of the wagon that moved down wilderness roads in the dark of the night, with never a horse drawing it – the wagon that was full of severed heads and dismembered limbs; and the yellow horse, the ghastly dream horse that raced up and down the stairs of the grand old plantation house where a wicked woman lay dying; and the ghost-switches that swished against doors when none dared open those doors lest reason be blasted at what was seen. And in many of her tales, also, appeared the old, deserted plantation mansion, with the weeds growing rank about it and the ghostly pigeons flying up from the rails of the verandah.

Pour ce qui est de Mary Bohannon, il se trouve que j'ai retrouvé et confirmé l'existence de celle-ci il y a quelques années lors de mes recherches sur Bagwell, et voilà le résultat du travail:

http://www.robert-e-howard.org/Louinet/dwelling4a.htm

La grand-mère était Louiza Elizabeth (Eliza) Henry. J'ai retrouvé plusieurs choses sur elle, mais il ne faut surtout pas croire ce que raconte REH en matière de généalogie. Quand il parle de pionniers, de grand proprétaires terriens, etc. il faut comprendre paysans sans le sou et illetré. Howard a totalement réinventé sa généalogie (l'exemple le plus fameux étant le supposé géant viking Sam Walser, qui ne s'appelait pas Sam, n'était pas un géant, et était un commerçant aux origines Suisses!). Donc, quand REH raconte que les Henry s'appelaient McHenry, Shamus McEnry, et s'étaient fait virer d'Irlande par les Anglais, il ne fait que raconter des conneries...
Storyteller avant tout.
Désolé de casser le mythe.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
louinet

avatar

Nombre de messages : 520
Localisation : Tarantia
Date d'inscription : 15/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 4:50

ou là là...

Par où commencer...

Voici déja le texte auquel Truchaud se référait, tiré d'une lettre à Lovecraft de Septembre 1930:

As regards African-legend sources, I well remember the tales I listened to and shivered at, when a child in the “piney woods” of East Texas, where Red River marks the Arkansaw and Texas boundaries. There were quite a number of old slave darkies still living then. The one to whom I listened most was the cook, old Aunt Mary Bohannon, who was nearly white – about one sixteenth negro, I should say. Mistreatment of slaves is, and has been somewhat exaggerated, but old Aunt Mary had had the misfortune, in her youth, to belong to a man whose wife was a fiend from Hell. The young slave women were fine young animals, and barbarically handsome; her mistress was frenziedly jealous. You understand. Aunt Mary told tales of torture and unmistakable sadism that sickens [sic] me to this day when I think of them. Thank God the slaves on my ancestors’ plantations were never so misused. And Aunt Mary told how one day, when the black people were in the fields, a hot wind swept over them and they knew that “ol’ Misses Bohannon” was dead. Returning to the manor house they found that it was so and the slaves danced and shouted with joy. Aunt Mary said that when a good spirit passes, a breath of cool air follows; but when an evil spirit goes by a blast from the open doors of Hell follows it.
She told many tales, one which particularly made my hair rise; it occurred in her youth. A young girl going to the river for water, met, in the dimness of dusk, an old man, long dead, who carried his severed head in one hand. This, said Aunt Mary, occurred on the plantation of her master, and she herself saw the girl come screaming through the dusk, to be whipped for throwing away the water-buckets in her flight.
Another tale she told that I have often met with in negro-lore. The setting, time and circumstances are changed by telling, but the tale remains basically the same. Two or three men – usually negroes – are travelling in a wagon through some isolated district – usually a broad, deserted river-bottom. They come on to the ruins of a once thriving plantation at dusk, and decide to spend the night in the deserted plantation house. This house is always huge, brooding and forbidding, and always, as the men approach the high columned verandah, through the high weeds that surround the house, great numbers of pigeons rise from their roosting places on the railing and fly away. The men sleep in the big front-room with its crumbling fire-place, and in the night they are awakened by a jangling of chains, weird noises and groans from upstairs. Sometimes footsteps descend the stairs with no visible cause. Then a terrible apparition appears to the men who flee in terror. This monster, in all the tales I have heard, is invariably a headless giant, naked or clad in shapeless [sic] sort of garment, and is sometimes armed with a broad-axe. This motif appears over and over in negro-lore. I do not know what sort of tales modern darkies tell. For years I have lived in a section where negroes are very rare. Indeed, no colored person is allowed to remain over night in this county.
But through most of the stories I heard in my childhood, the dark, brooding old plantation house loomed as a horrific back-ground and the human or semi-human horror, with its severed head was woven in the fiber of the myths.
But no negro ghost-story ever gave me the horrors as did the tales told by my grandmother. All the gloominess and dark mysticism of the Gaelic nature was her’s [sic], and there was no light and mirth in her. Her tales showed what a strange legion of folk-lore grew up in the Scotch-Irish settlements of the Southwest, where transplanted Celtic myths and fairy-tales met and mingled with a sub-stratem [sic] of slave legends. My grandmother was but one generation removed from south Ireland and she knew by heart all the tales and superstitions of the folks, black or white, about her.
As a child my hair used to stand straight up when she would tell of the wagon that moved down wilderness roads in the dark of the night, with never a horse drawing it – the wagon that was full of severed heads and dismembered limbs; and the yellow horse, the ghastly dream horse that raced up and down the stairs of the grand old plantation house where a wicked woman lay dying; and the ghost-switches that swished against doors when none dared open those doors lest reason be blasted at what was seen. And in many of her tales, also, appeared the old, deserted plantation mansion, with the weeds growing rank about it and the ghostly pigeons flying up from the rails of the verandah.

Pour ce qui est de Mary Bohannon, il se trouve que j'ai retrouvé et confirmé l'existence de celle-ci il y a quelques années lors de mes recherches sur Bagwell, et voilà le résultat du travail:

http://www.robert-e-howard.org/Louinet/dwelling4a.htm

La grand-mère était Louiza Elizabeth (Eliza) Henry. J'ai retrouvé plusieurs choses sur elle, mais il ne faut surtout pas croire ce que raconte REH en matière de généalogie. Quand il parle de pionniers, de grand proprétaires terriens, etc. il faut comprendre paysans sans le sou et illetré. Howard a totalement réinventé sa généalogie (l'exemple le plus fameux étant le supposé géant viking Sam Walser, qui ne s'appelait pas Sam, n'était pas un géant, et était un commerçant aux origines Suisses!). Donc, quand REH raconte que les Henry s'appelaient McHenry, Shamus McEnry, et s'étaient fait virer d'Irlande par les Anglais, il ne fait que raconter des conneries...
Storyteller avant tout.
Désolé de casser le mythe.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Steve Costigan

avatar

Nombre de messages : 592
Age : 38
Localisation : Reims !
Date d'inscription : 14/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 6:09

Tout ça est excessivement intéressant. Quand j'avais entendu dire que le jeune Howard écoutait les histoires que lui racontaient cette "cuisinière" et sa grand-mère, je ne pensais pas du tout à ce genre d'histoires. A ce sujet, la conclusion de ton article est fort intéressante.
J'ignorais aussi l'agrandissement épique que fit Howard avec sa généalogie. Il rêvait d'être quelqu'un d'autre et ces rêves l'amenèrent à transformer les faits.
Le faisait-il sciemment ? Rien n'est moins sûr à mon avis. Quand quelqu'un s'imagine des ancêtres glorieux et qu'il apprend qu'ils ne le sont pas, il arrive souvent que l'esprit se focalise alors sur un détail minime qui lui plaise, et que le reste, de manière inconsciente, s'organise autour...
Bien sûr, ça n'est qu'une hypothèse.

_________________
There is no force, no money and no power to stop us now !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://sanahultivers.over-blog.com/
louinet

avatar

Nombre de messages : 520
Localisation : Tarantia
Date d'inscription : 15/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 6:31

REH avait fait des recherches étonnemment poussées de sa généalogie. Il butait sur deux choses: l'histoire de ses parents, zone d'ombre assez incroyable, et sur le premier de la lignée à avoir touché les rives Américaines. Pour le reste, il était bon, voire très bon. Mais dans ces deux cas, il inventait totalement. Irlandais chassés de leurs pays, riches propriétaires fonciers et Vikings conquérants, autant de mensonges.
Faut dire que maman Howard racontait à son filston qu'ils descendaient de la noblesse irlandaise...

Patrice
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Steve Costigan

avatar

Nombre de messages : 592
Age : 38
Localisation : Reims !
Date d'inscription : 14/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 6:38

Quand tu dis qu'il butait sur deux choses, c'est qu'il n'avait réussi à trouver aucune information dessus ? Ou bien que ce qu'il savait ne lui plaisait pas et qu'il a refaçonner ce pan d'histoire ?

_________________
There is no force, no money and no power to stop us now !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://sanahultivers.over-blog.com/
louinet

avatar

Nombre de messages : 520
Localisation : Tarantia
Date d'inscription : 15/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 6:42

Il ne voulait pas voir certaines choses. Pour le "premier de la lignée", il réinventait; pour ses parents (et grand-parents quand l'histoire des deux se chvauchait), soit il noyait le poisson, soit il écrivait des choses qui se contredisaient, ou qui ne résistaient pas à l'analyse la plus banale. Il s'aveuglait tout seul, ne voulant pas voir.

Patrice
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Steve Costigan

avatar

Nombre de messages : 592
Age : 38
Localisation : Reims !
Date d'inscription : 14/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 7 Déc - 6:50

Dans l'oeuvre de REH, on trouve énormément de renvoies aux ancêtres des personnages. ceux-ci font régulièrement partie d'une lignée fière et féroce. il est beaucoup fait référence au sang qui coule dans les veines etc...
Probablement que Howard se rassurait quant à l'homme qu'il était en s'imaginant une lignée de héros celtes farouches derrière lui. Donc cette idée aurait été contredite par les faits et il aurait occulté ces derniers...
Intéressant en tous cas cette ascendance noble dont lui parlait sa mère.

_________________
There is no force, no money and no power to stop us now !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://sanahultivers.over-blog.com/
alpasdebol

avatar

Nombre de messages : 328
Date d'inscription : 02/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 4 Mar - 8:57

En terme de généalogie il est très difficile de remonter loin quand on n'est pas d'origine noble.

J'en ai moi même fait l'expérience: en faisant des recherches sur mon nom de famille j'ai découvert que je portait le nom d'un héros gallois post-arthurien (7e siècle), un tueur de géant vengeance afro

Faute d'information je ne peux pas aller aussi loin que mes rêves et autres fantasmes de sang brave Laughing

Mes recherches m'ont amené vers une triste vérité: mon nom est un patronyme très courant en Galles et il peut probable que je soit un descendant des premiers Prince de Galles Embarassed

Je pense qu'Howard a dû avoir le même genre d'expérience (peut être sans le linguiste du CNRS qui t'explique que tu rêves...) et après tout pourquoi pas?
N'importe qui ayant du sang irlandais peut prétendre être descendant de Cuchullain ou autre Goll Mac Morna king
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
louinet

avatar

Nombre de messages : 520
Localisation : Tarantia
Date d'inscription : 15/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 4 Mar - 9:10

Pour les Américains, très globalement, la généalogie commence avec le premier ancêtre à avoir mis le pied sur le continent Américain. Avant, c'est bien plus de la légende qu'autre chose, le plus souvent.
Je ne doute absolument pas que Howard ait eu du sang irlandais. Statistiquement, si on remonte de dix générations par rapport à lui, (pour arriver donc simplement vers 1700), il avait 1024 ancêtres. C'est bien le diable s'il y n'y avait pas un buveur de Guinness là-dedans! Mais par contre, tout ce qu'il disait sur le sujet, c'était de l'invention ou de la déformation pure, du style son ancêtre James Henry qui se serait appelé Shamus McEnry et aurait épousé une Anna O'Tyrrell née à Galway, et qui - Shamus - serait né sur un bateau entre l'Irlande et les USA parce que sa famille avait été chassée d'Irlande par un aristocrate anglais (!!!). Tout cela n'est que pipeau et invention pure et assumée. James Henry s'est toujours appelé James Henry et il est bien né aux USA. Comme O'Tyrrell ne s'est jamais appelée comme ça - ce nom n'existe pas - mais était sans doute Anna Terrell.
Mon histoire préférée reste quand même celle du soi-disant Sam (en fait David) Walser qui était un géant Viking aux yeux bleus né dans les contrées glacées des pays nordiques... et qui était en fait un petit bonhomme né en Suisse et horloger de son état.
Ah, lire les lettres de Howard, c'est bien souvent lire une nouvelle de Cormac FitzGeoffrey, tiens!

Patrice
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
alpasdebol

avatar

Nombre de messages : 328
Date d'inscription : 02/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 4 Mar - 10:15

Ca me rappelle mon père qui racontait tout le temps que son arrière grand père était un pêcheur d'Islande, qu'il a navigué sur des voiliers en plein Atlantique Nord pour pêcher la morue...
Jusqu'à ce qu'une de nos tantes découvre que l'illustre ancètre était bien marin mais qu'il est mort en faisant du cabotage dans le golfe du morbihan Embarassed

Quoiqu'il en soit c'est la preuvequ'Howard avait de l'imagination et qu'il préférait les rêves à notre triste réalité jocolor
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Lucifel

avatar

Nombre de messages : 45
Age : 47
Localisation : Nehwon
Date d'inscription : 15/05/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   Mer 25 Mar - 11:05

Tout celà est très intéressant, et confirme que R.E.H. était avant tout un conteur. Fantasmer ses ancêtres me semble être la moindre des choses lorsque l'on est un écrivain de la trempe de Howard.
Celà ne m'étonnes pas du tout, et colle très bien à l'image (fantasmée elle aussi) que je me fais de lui. Pourrait-il en être autrement? Wink

Tout ça nous amène aux oeuvres des grands auteurs fantastiques des siècles précédents, pas mal barrés pour la plupart, à commencer par Poe et Lovecraft.
Et je ne parle pas des poètes, il faudrait écrire une thèse...

R.E.H. était perdu pour notre monde, au grand avantage du sien, celui que nous connaissons et que nous aimons.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Le sens du récit chez REH   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Le sens du récit chez REH
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» visite chez le gynéco
» Jean-Bertrand Aristide doit rentrer chez lui !
» L'on n'est jamais mieux que chez soi!
» Retour chez soi (suite de moment de détente) [PV : Calypso]
» Choix de l\'épée, notamment chez les Dúnedain

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Les Chroniques Némédiennes :: La Grande Bibliothèque de Tarantia-
Sauter vers: